DyeYourYarn.com Blog 3rd Page

A blog for short bits about dyeing experiments, new food colors, where to get cheap supplies, dyers in the news, yarn hints and Kool tidbits that aren't full pages on DyeYourYarn.

Too Much Dye?

When you rinse your dyed yarn, is an awful lot of dye running down the drain?

This seems to happen to dyers creating dark blue yarn and, less often, saturated red yarn.

If you are using 

  • dyeable yarn, 
  • artificial food colors,
  •  you remembered the vinegar (or are using Kool-Aid) 
  • the dyebath reached 180 degrees F

and you are still having problems with bleeding the problem is most likely that you have used too much dye for the fiber to absorb.

The colors in my charts and samples are as dark as they will go on white yarn.

Adding more drops of color or more packets of drink mix at some point isn't going to make the yarn darker. The color may stick to itself, but it isn't bonded to the yarn.

When you rinse the yarn, the sticky color washes off.

The solution is to use a gray base yarn.


Custom Colored Buttons

If you need buttons to match your yarn, try dyeing the buttons with food color.

The buttons must be nylon, like those in the center of the photo.



Queen Food Colour

These samples are Queen Rainbow Food Colour as they come out of the bottle.

The W is on a white base yarn, the O is on oatmeal base yarn.


 Invisible Kool-Aids

Joining Invisible Watermelon Kiwi Kool-Aid, is Invisible Grape Illusion and Invisible Changin' Cherry flavors.

But the grape and cherry flavors contain sugar.

So you might want to stock up on the non-sugared Watermelon Kiwi.


Overdye Multi-Colored Yarn

When digging through the clearance bins at the yarn store, or cleaning out your stash...

don't forget, you can overdye striped or multicolored yarn.

Try a light glaze of food color to unify or a hefty dose to completely change the yarn.

Examples of overdyeing.


Use Up Excess Dye

I keep a bag of odd bits of fiber, leftover yarn and wool fabric bits.

If I have spare dye from my dyeing project, I stuff  a jar with a handful out of the bag.

The "new" fiber and yarn is sometimes inspiring. And even if it's not, I can always use it for plush animal stuffing.


Keeping Your Dyebath Warmer, Longer

Blue food color is a bit finicky.

It requires more acidity than other colors.

And also more time to bond.

I tuck jars of hot dye and yarn into an insulated bag and allow to cool overnight.

The majority of the time, the water is total clear in the morning.


Queen Food Colour Formulas

Hello, to our Australian dyers!

We've created a page of formulas using Queen Rainbow Food Colours.

Thank you for the kind gift from HanKnits! These colors are great fun to work with.




Example of A Good Seam on a Hand Knit

This is a hand knit sweater knit in pieces.

The wine colored yarn is used to hold the pieces together.

This type of construction is great if you're recycling the yarn.

Use a seam ripper to cut the this strand, and you're ready to frog.


Virtual Garden

Dark and rainy, but tomorrow is the Big Plant Sale.

Here's a photo of our front yard, altered using PicMonkey.com .

The flowers are located in the overlay icon section. You can choose roses or daisies, drop and drag and change their colors.

Great project for gardeners and easy enough for a first grader.



The Rule of 3

In Ye Olde Days, I used to quilt.

Sewing little fabric bits together, matching the corners can be frustrating.

I invented the Rule of 3.

If the corners didn't match, I ripped out the stitches. If they didn't match again, I ripped again.

If they didn't match the third time... I let it be.

The matching improved 75% between the first and second try, and another 25% between the second and third.

There was virtually no improvement on a fourth try.

My Rule of 3 carries into my knitting.

The photo is a set of three scarves. One is curved, one is unbalanced, and one is just right.


Sock Loom and Bits of Yarn

Testing my new sock loom, I've come to the conclusion that while I might make a few American Girls socks, I won't be human socks.

Not two anyway.

Not during gardening season.

I did make a tube sock shape, added a tassel and ended up with a scissor cosy.


Mini Foal Runs Wild

Hannahhat's first video is posted. She did the photography, the editing and added music.

Here's the link to the video page. (For some reason, the video doesn't always show up below.)


First Church Rummage Sale of the Season

More shoppers… Fewer Donations.

Despite the media telling us the economy is doing fine, my nine year history of snooping and buying at this sale says it's not.

(The yarn was over priced and junky, by the way).

Six years ago, the children's clothing took up three large tables stacked two feet high. Shoppers were either grandmas looking for nice clothing or moms with kids in tow searching for school clothes.

This year, all the  kid's clothes could have fit on single table. There were just three pair of girl's jeans.

Jeans are a bit like loaves of bread. Kids "need" about 6 pair per season. The pant legs get too short and they go into the donation box.

Also missing were those nauseating novelty tops made out of cheap "cotton" with spaghetti straps and a misplaced ruffle, a spew of rhinestones or a googley eyed cartoon character.

Parents are buying fewer new things (including Happy Meals, judging from the lack of cheap plastic toys at this sale).


A Hint for Washing Fleece

A reader asked about a quicker way to wash very dirty fleece.

We stuff dry fleece in zippered mesh bags.

The bags fit nicely in the plastic tubs sold to put in your kitchen sink.

Three plastic tubs are lined up on the floor, each with very hot water (to melt the lanolin) and the smallest amount of the blue Dawn dish washing detergent.

The bag of fleece soaks in each tub, down the line. Tub 1 is refilled after every new bag, Tub 2 after every other and tub 3 as the water cools.

The bags then go in a 5 gallon bucket of rinse water.

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